Holistic Health Show with Carl Helvie logoA new study published in the J of Clinical Oncology that analyzed five large prospective cohort studies reported that lung cancer (stage 1) bladder, kidney., and head and neck cancer survivors who smoked 20 or more cigarettes a day prior to their cancer diagnosis have an up to five-fold higher risk of developing a second smoking-related cancer when compared to survivors of the same cancer who never smoked. This association of smoking and 2nd cancer  was similar to smoking and primary cancers.

Researc hers said “As survival improves for a number of smoke-related cancers, patients are living longer, however,, smoking may increase the risk of developing a second smoking-related cancer among these survivors.” They continued on to say that health care professionals should emphasize the importance of smoking-cessation to all patients, including cancer survivors.

Data for these results included 5 prospective studies which included 2,552 patients with stage 1 lung, 6.386 with bladder, 3,179 with kidney, and 2,967 with head and neck cancer.  A total of 866 second primary smoking-related cancers were diagnosed among the survivors and the association between smoking status prior to primary cancer diagnosis and second smoke-associated cancer risk were assessed. In all four groups those who smoked   20 or more cigarettes daily prior to their first diagnoses were more likely to develop aa second smoking-related cancer when compared to the cohort who never smoked. These risks ranged from 3.3 times more like to 5.3 times more like likely depending upon the site of the cancer. In addition, those who were current smokers but smoked under 20 cigarettes a day or former smokers who quit before their first cancer diagnosis also had an elevated risk of developing a second primary cancer than those who never smoked.