Is Smoking Associated with an Increased Risk of Developing a Second Smoking-Related Cancer?

Posted by in all cancers, Blog, cancer, cancer risk, cancer survivors

A new study published in the J of Clinical Oncology that analyzed five large prospective cohort studies reported that lung cancer (stage 1) bladder, kidney., and head and neck cancer survivors who smoked 20 or more cigarettes a day prior to their cancer diagnosis have an up to five-fold higher risk of developing a second smoking-related cancer when compared to survivors of the same cancer who never smoked. This association of smoking and 2nd...

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Can a Simple Blood Test Be Used for Early Cancer Detection?

Posted by in all cancers, Blog, cancer, cancer detection

Research  published in a recent issue of the British Journal of Cancer concluded that high levels of calcium (hypercalcaemia) in blood could be used by practitioners as early indications of certain types of cancer and encourage other diagnostic tests. Hypercalcemia occurs in 10 to 20 percent of people with cancer. Researchers said “All previous studies of hypercalcaemia and cancer had been carried out with patients who had already been...

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Can a Blood Test Detect all Types of Cancer?

Posted by in all cancers, Blog, cancer, cancer detection

New research published online in FASEB Journal, The U.S.Journal of American Societies for Experimental Biology, concluded that a revolutionary blood test that could detect any type off cancer was developed by British scientists. The test6 has been shown to diagnose cancer and pre-cancerous conditions from blood of patients with melanoma, colon cancer and lung cancer with a high degree of accuracy. Researchers assessed white blood cells and...

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Can the Metastasis of Cancer Cells be Prevented?

Posted by in all cancers, Blog, cancer, cancer research

In a recent study published in the journal Cell Reports  researchers reported that they successfully performed the first ever block of tumor cells migrating to other sites. They were able to pinpoint a family of pharmaceutical compounds whose action prevents the appearance of tumor metastasis by studying the mitochondria in tumor cells. These organelles are considered to be the cells power station. But when their functioning is altered in tumor...

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Can Vitamin A Assist in Cancer Prevention?

Posted by in all cancers, Blog, cancer, cancer prevention

Research published recently in the International Journal of Oncology concluded that a derivative of vitamin A known as retinoic acid that is found in carrots and sweet potatoes helps pre-cancer cells revert back to normal cells. The researchers exposed four types of breast cells to different concentrations of retinoic acid including normal, precancerous, cancerous, and fully aggressive cancer cells. They noted that precancer cells began to look...

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Can a Simple Handshake Identify Cancer Survivors?

Posted by in all cancers, Blog, cancer, cancer survivors

A new study published in Support Care Cancer confirmed a link between handgrip strength and survival rates of patients. In the study 203 patients with advanced stage cancers squeezed a device known as a dynamometer with their dominant hand, The instrument then measured peak grip strength. “This measure is one of several to categorize patients according to the severity of their disease. It can help determine interventions they may need, whether...

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Can a Gold Caffeine Drink Fight Cancer?

Posted by in all cancers, Blog, cancer, cancer prevention

Researchers reporting in the American Cancer Society journal Inorganic Chemistry  that combining a caffeine-based drink such as coffee or an energy drink with a small amount of gold could one day be used an an anticancer agent. Both substances have been identified as possible cancer treatments but taken in the amounts separately to do that would have negative effects on healthy cells . Thus, researchers put the two compounds together in...

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Do LGBT Youth Face Greater Cancer Risks?

Posted by in all cancers, Blog, cancer, cancer risk

A new study published in the American Journal of Public Health concluded that youth of same-sex orientation are more likely to engage in behaviors associated with cancer risks than heterosexual youth. Using data from 2005 and 2007 on over 65,000 youth in grades 9 to 12 of which 7.6 percent were found to be sexual minorities researchers evaluated 12 cancer-risk behaviors. These included tobacco use, drinking alcohol, early sex, multiple sexual...

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