Prayer and Cancer

Posted by in alternative cancer therapies, cancer, Mental and Spiritual, prayer

In a randomized study reported in PubMed.gov in 2012 researchers studied 999 cancer patients at a cancer center between 2003 and 2008 to evaluate the effects of intercessory prayer when added to normal cancer care. Subjects completed Quality of Life and Spiritual Well Being tools at the beginning of the study and 6 months later.  Subjects were prayed for over the study period. Results showed that the intervention group had significantly greater...

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Compassion and Cancer Research

Posted by in cancer, cancer research, compassion

In 1999, Fogarty et al published research in the Journal of Clinical Oncology on the effect of physician compassion on client’s anxiety, information recall, treatment decisions, and assessment of physician characteristics. One hundred twenty three healthy breast cancer survivors and 87 women without cancer were participants. A randomized pre/post test control group design with a standardized videotape intervention was used. Participants...

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Gratitude research (some studies specific to cancer)

Posted by in alternative cancer therapies, cancer, cancer research, gratitude, Research

In a study in the journal of personality and social psychology in 2003 researchers asked subjects to write a few sentences each week, focusing on particular topics. One group wrote about things they were grateful for that had occurred during the week. A second group wrote about daily irritations or things that had displeased them, and the third wrote about events that had affected them (with no emphasis on them being positive or negative)....

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Faith, Prayer and Cancer Research

Posted by in alternative cancer therapies, Blog, cancer, cancer research, faith

In 1987, Soderstrom and Martison studied the coping strategies of cancer patients and found the most common coping strategy was praying alone or with others, and having others pray for them. In a related study in 1994, Cayse studied stressors and coping strategies of fathers of cancer patients and found that of 29 separate potential strategies, prayer was both the most common and most helpful for men. In 1998, Ferrell et al, studied a random...

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Optimism and Cancer Research

Posted by in alternative cancer therapies, behaviour, Blog, cancer, cancer research, optimism

In 1993, Carver et al studied how coping mediates the effect of optimism on distress. Fifty nine breast cancer patients were studied and reported on their overall optimism about life and recent coping responses and distress levels at the following times; at diagnosis, 1 day presurgery, 10 days postsurgery, and at 3-, 6-, and 12-mo follow-ups.  Results showed that optimism related inversely to distress at each point, even controlling for prior...

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Meditation and Cancer Research

Posted by in alternative cancer therapies, Blog, cancer, cancer research, meditation

In the 1970’s Ainslie Meares published a series of studies about cancer patients being treated with meditation with evidence of regression of tumors in some patients while not having had any orthodox treatment that could have affected the outcome. These included a woman with breast cancer (1976), a man with ontogenetic sarcoma (1978), two patients with Hodgkin’s disease (1978, and a patient with carcinoma of the rectum (1979). Additional...

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Visualization Guided Imagery and Cancer Research

Posted by in Blog, cancer, visualization

In 1999, Walker et al studied the influence of visualization and relaxation on cancer patients receiving chemotherapy to see if they would improve the quality of life and the treatment responses. Ninety-six women with newly diagnosed advanced breast cancer took part in a prospective, randomized controlled trial where they were randomly placed in a control group (standard care) or experimental group (standard care plus relaxation training and...

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Music Therapy (Sound) and Cancer Research

Posted by in alternative cancer therapies, Blog, cancer, cancer research, music therapy

In 2015 the American Cancer Association on their website stated there is some evidence that, when used with conventional treatment, music therapy can help reduce pain and relieve chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in cancer patients. It may also relieve stress, improve coping and mood, and provide an overall sense of well-being. In addition, some studies have found that music therapy can lower heart rate, blood pressure, and breathing...

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Are people who feel gratitude more satisfied in life?

Posted by in Blog, cancer, gratitude, optimism, spirituality and gratitude

A new study published in the journal Personality and Individual Differences concluded that people who are materialistic tend to be depressed and unsatisfied, in part because they find it harder to feel gratitude for what they have. They say materialism tends to be “me-centered” and focuses upon what one does not have and impairs the ability to be grateful for what one does have. On the other hand, gratitude is a positive mood and about helping...

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Research on Spirituality, Religion and Health

Posted by in Blog, spirituality, spirituality and gratitude

A new study published in Psychology of Religion and Spirituality concluded that religion and spirituality have distinct but complementary influences on health. The researchers are trying to understand religion, spirituality and health and developed a theoretical model to define spirituality and religion. They say religiousness included formal religious affiliation and service attendance and is associated with better health habits, such as lower...

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Can a Sense of Meaning and Purpose Extend Life and Overcome Illness?

Posted by in Blog, sense of purpose

A new study published in Lancet of 9,050 people with an average age of 65 found that the people with the greatest well-being were 30% less likely to die during the eight and a half year follow-up period than those with less well being. Questionnaires were used to measure a type of well being called “eudemonic well being” which relates to a sense of control, feeling that what you do is worthwhile, and a sense of purpose. People were placed into...

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Can a Sense of Purpose Increase your Life Span?

Posted by in Blog, sense of purpose

A new study published in Psychological Science concluded if you feel you have a sense of purpose in life it helps you to live longer, no matter what age you are. The researchers said “Our findings point to the fact that finding a direction for life, and setting overarching goals for what you want to achieve can help you actually live longer, regardless of when you find your purpose.” Although previous studies have suggested that finding a...

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