Holistic Health Show with Carl Helvie logoA new study published early online in Cancer concluded that smokers who used e-cigarettes were less likely to quit smoking that non-users. The researcher studied 1074 cancer patients who smoked and were enrolled between 2012 and 1013 in a tobacco treatment program. Researchers found a three fold increase in e-cigarette use from 2012 to 2013 (10.6 vs 38.5 percent). At enrollment the e-cigarette users were more nicotine dependent than the non-user group, had more prior attempts to quit, and were more likely to be diagnosed with lung and head and neck cancer. At the follow up the e-smokers were as likely to be smoking as the non-users. The seven day abstinence rates were 44.4 percent and 43.3 percent respectively. Researchers concluded that e-cigarette use among tobacco-dependent cancer patients had increased over the past two years but additional studies were needed because oif limitations in the current study.